health

Lifestyle and Income-related Inequality in Health in South Africa

Evidence suggests that lifestyle factors may explain the income-related inequality in self-reported health. This paper expands this literature by examining the contribution of smoking and alcohol consumption, incorporating more objective measures of health directly associated with these lifestyle practices. The Erreygers' corrected concentration index is used to measure health inequalities over time. The indices are decomposed into observable covariates including smoking and alcohol use.

Impact on Health on Labour Force Participation in South Africa

This paper quantifies the impact of health on labour force participation, using South Africa as a case study. This is important given the essential role the labour market plays in economic growth and the potential for poor health to adversely affect labour market outcomes. South Africa has experienced significant disease burden especially due to communicable diseases like HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. Moreover, conditions like obesity remain a public health concern. Furthermore, the country has witnessed declining labour force participation in recent years.

The Impact of Obesity on Employment in South Africa

Obesity is a growing health problem in South Africa. This health problem could have various implications for the South African economy. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of obesity on employment status in South Africa with the use of household survey data. The study followed a quantitative research design that involved household survey data analysis through the use of a bivariate probit model to validate the relationship between obesity and employment.

Southern African Customs Union Revenue, Public Expenditures and HIV/AIDS in BLNS Countries

This study sets out to investigate how revenue from the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) common revenue pool affect efforts to contain HIV/AIDS in Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia and Swaziland (BLNS countries). Using a panel data set of the BLNS countries covering the period 1990-2007 in annual frequency and a health production function, we show that an increase in either SACU revenue or aggregate government expenditure increases HIV prevalence rates.

Heights and Development in a Cash-Crop Colony: Living Standards in Ghana, 1870-1980

While Ghana is a classic case of economic growth in an agricultural‐export colony, scholars have queried whether it was sustained, and how far its benefits were widely distributed, socially and regionally. Using height as a measure of human well‐being we explore the evolution of living standards and regional inequality in Ghana from 1870 to 1980. Our findings suggest that, overall, living standards improved during colonial times and that a trend reversal occurred during the economic crisis in the 1973‐83.

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