O16

Economic Development: Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

Monetary policy in a model with commodity and financial market

This paper builds a small open economy model for a net commodity exporter to consider financial frictions and monetary policies in order to investigate the main determinants of business cycles. Since we make a distinction to the access of financial markets between the commodity and non-commodity sectors, we notice that as usual, a commodity price shock benefits the competitiveness of the economy and its borrowing terms.

Effect of Financial Development on Economic Growth in sub–Saharan Africa: Does Sectoral Growth Matter?

This paper examines the overall economic growth effect when the growth in finance and real sector is disproportionate relying on panel data for 29 sub–Saharan African countries over the period 1980–2014. Results from the system generalized method of moments (GMM) reveal that, while financial development supports economic growth, the extent to which finance helps growth depends crucially on the simultaneous growth of real and financial sectors.

Spatial Externalities, Openness and Financial Development in SADC: Beyond the Multilateral Monetary Agreement

This study empirically evaluates spatial externalities in financial development in SADC in line with spatial proximity theory, which asserts that externalities increase with proximity. Precisely, the study tests if financially less developed economies in SADC benefit from linkages with and proximity to South Africa, a financially developed economy. The Spatial Durbin Model estimated using GMM and Dynamic Panel Estimations, establishes that financial development in the SADC region is sensitive to space and hence not immune to spatial externalities.

Financial sector development and threshold effect of inflation in ECOWAS and SADC: A Panel smooth transition regression approach

The financial sector of an economy is now widely agreed to constitute a potential important channel for growth. Many regions such as Sub-Saharan Africa, however, have relatively underdeveloped financial sector. Although several policy designs have been used to induce growth in the sector, there has been little or no success in the majority of the countries in the region. Existing theories suggest that inflation has negative effects on financial development. Other theories argue that inflation has a threshold effects on financial development.

Financial sector development, Inflation and Openness: A comparative panel study of ECOWAS and SADC

This paper provides an empirical analysis of the comparative study between the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and Southern African Development Community (SADC) on the role of inflation in explaining the state of financial development of the two regions. In addition, the study seeks to

Bank Deposit Contracts Versus Financial Market Participation in Emerging Economies

The financial sector of emerging economies in Africa is characterized by a non-competitive banking sector which dominates any direct participation of agents in asset markets. Based on a variant of Diamond and Dybvig's (1983) model of financial inter-mediation, we formally explain both stylized facts through market inexperience”of agents in emerging economies. While experienced agents correctly predict future mar- ket clearing equilibrium prices, inexperienced agents are ignorant about future market equilibria.

Chinese Foreign Direct Investment in Africa

The eyes of the world have, in recent years, been steadfastly focused on China’s economic progress. As China has in recent years emerged as a major player on the world economic stage, its growing relations with other developing regions received much attention. Of particular note is the way in which Sino-African relations have increased since 2000. This paper aims to put Chinese FDI in Africa into perspective and provide some answers on the nature and possible impact of these flows to the continent.

On the Looting of Nations

We develop a dynamic discrete choice model of an unchecked ruler making decisions regarding the development of a resource-rich country. Resources serve as collateral and facilitate the acquisition of loans. The ruler chooses either to stay in power while facing the risk of being ousted, or loot the country’s riches by liquefying the resources through lending. We show that unstructured lending from international credit markets can create incentives to loot the country; and an enhanced likelihood of looting causes greater political instability, and diminishes growth.

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