L40

Antitrust Issues and Policies: General

Benefits of regulation vs competition where inequality is high: The case of mobile telephony in South Africa

We test for the distributional effects of regulation and entry in the mobile telecommunications sector in a highly unequal country, South Africa. Using six waves of a consumer survey of over 134,000 individuals between 2009-2014, we estimate a discrete-choice model allowing for individual-specific price-responsiveness and preferences for network operators. Next, we use a demand and supply equilibrium framework to simulate prices and the distribution of welfare without entry and mobile termination rate regulation.

Regulatory ambiguity and policy uncertainty in South Africa’s telecommunications sector

The competitive effects of telecommunications transactions and the related impact that they have on economic growth and employment are influenced by the regulatory environment that governs the sector. In South Africa, the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) is responsible for implementing and enforcing ex ante regulation, while the Competition Commission’s role is to identify and remedy anti-competitive behaviour.

The Consistency of Merger Decisions in a Developing Country: The South African Competition Commission

The South African Competition Commission's merger decisions for FY2002 through FY2009 are analyzed to empirically identify the factors historically influencing prohibition, conditional approval and unconditional approval. The key explanatory variables are linked to provisions of the 1998 Competition Act, such that the analysis provides insight into the consistency of merger decisions with respect to the legal requirements specified in the Act.

Asymmetry and discrimination in internet peering evidence from the LINX

Is the quality of interconnection between Internet operators affected by their asymmetry? While recent game theoretic literature provides contrasting answers to this question, there is a lack of empirical research. We introduce a novel dataset based on Internet routing policies, and study the interconnection decisions amongst the Internet Service Providers (ISPs) members of the London Internet Exchange Point (LINX). Our results show that interconnection quality degradation can be significantly explained by asymmetry between providers.

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