H22

Taxation and Subsidies: Incidence

The household effects of very large electricity tariff hikes in Zambia

This paper simulates the real household expenditure effects of electricity price increases in Zambia. First, we find that electricity subsidies are highly regressive. Second, our partial equilibrium model simulations of the welfare effects of electricity tariff rises show that poorer households suffer larger percentage losses in real expenditures compared to wealthier households. Naturally, this leads to increases in poverty. We find that removing electricity subsidies and transferring the realised fiscal savings to social cash transfers reduces extreme poverty significantly.

Indirect Taxation and Gender Equity: Evidence from South Africa

This paper explores the equity implications of indirect or consumption taxes from a gender perspective, using detailed expenditure data for South Africa. While a growing literature on the incidence of indirect taxes investigates their impact on the income distribution in developing countries, there is little work on whether indirect taxes have differential gender outcomes. Gender bias is likely to exist in taxes that are levied on consumption expenditure, because men and women (and their households) spend their incomes on different types of goods, or on goods that are taxed differently.

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