C33

Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models: Models with Panel Data; Longitudinal Data; Spatial Time Series

Inequality in South Africa: what does a composite index of wellbeing reveal?

Policymakers need better information regarding wellbeing inequality to ascertain the contributing factors and to determine whether policy has been successful in improving the spread over time. In this paper, we construct a multidimensional composite wellbeing measure, at a micro level, which includes “economic and non-economic” and “objective and subjective measures” of wellbeing. We use NIDS data spanning the period 2008 – 2015. We compare the results on measuring wellbeing inequality using the composite index and income.

Access to micro – and informal loans: evaluating the impact on the quality of life of poor females in South Africa

Background: Since the early 1980s, many governments have investigated the possibility of utilising access to microloans as a pathway to grow economies out of unemployment and thereby improve people's quality of life. Studies that have previously investigated the impact of microloans found a positive relationship to quality of life. Unfortunately, these studies mainly measure quality of life using monetary (income) measures rather than assessing the entire multidimensionality of quality of life.

Effect of Financial Development on Economic Growth in sub–Saharan Africa: Does Sectoral Growth Matter?

This paper examines the overall economic growth effect when the growth in finance and real sector is disproportionate relying on panel data for 29 sub–Saharan African countries over the period 1980–2014. Results from the system generalized method of moments (GMM) reveal that, while financial development supports economic growth, the extent to which finance helps growth depends crucially on the simultaneous growth of real and financial sectors.

Regional disparities in income-independent quality of life in South Africa: convergence or divergence?

The purpose of this study is to add to the empirical literature regarding quality of life convergence dynamics. It achieves this by analysing and comparing income and income-independent quality of life (IIQoL) convergence dynamics across South Africa's 234 municipalities for the period 1996-2014. The study tested for convergence and utilised dynamic panel methods (systems GMM). The results indicate unconditional convergence in both income and IIQoL but at different rates.

Disentangling the exchange rate risk, sectoral export flows and financial development nexus

This paper examines the differential responses of various emerging market export sectors to exchange rate risk. This paper finds origin in initial theoretical posits of Ethier (1973) and Clark (1973) which both contend that exchange rate risk has a negative impact on the export flows of international trade participants who are assumed to be inherently risk averse.

Non-Economic Quality of Life and Population Density in South Africa

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between population density and non-economic quality of life. Popular opinion has generally been that population density can be seen as beneficial for economic growth, as it allows for greater productivity, greater incomes and can be translated into higher levels of quality of life. Recently though, growing evidence tends to suggest the exact opposite in that increases in productivity and incomes are not translated into better quality of life.

Occidental Rationalism: Its Early Impact on the Foundations of Modern Science

Rationalist thought has had a deep and lasting impact on modern civilisation. This influence has pervaded almost all facets of the socio-politico-economic and scientific domains of contemporary human experience. Religiously-oriented societies have, however, throughout their encounter with rationalism, generally struggled to reconcile some of their doctrines and practices with the principles espoused by rationalist philosophy. This strained relationship has always been particularly acute in the area of epistemology.

Do Capital Requirements Affect Cost of Intermediation? Evidence from a Panel of South African Banks

Since the 2007 sub-prime financial crisis, world bank capital ratios have increased. In this paper, we investigate the impact of increased bank capital requirements introduced under the Basel Accord framework on the costs of intermediation. We attempt to answer this central question by running panel regressions using 2001 – 2012 annual bank-level data for ten banks constituting inter alia the four largest South African banks. We conclude that high capital requirements are associated with increased costs of intermediation.

Real convergence using TAR panel unit root tests: an application to Southern African Development Community

The recent European Union crisis has sparked renewed interest in the achievement of convergence among potential member states prior to the establishment of a monetary union. This article examines real convergence in the per capita output of SADC countries using annual data from 1980 to 2013. An extension of the Evans & Karras’ approach that combines threshold modelling, panel data unit root testing and critical values bootstrapping is used in order to test for convergence.

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